Skip to main content

Rural Project Examples: Aging and aging-related services

Evidence-Based Examples

Fit & Strong!
Updated/reviewed August 2017
  • Need: Osteoarthritis is a chronic condition which often causes multiple related disabilities in older adults.
  • Intervention: An 8-week physical activity, behavior change, and falls prevention program geared to older adults with osteoarthritis.
  • Results: Participants gained confidence with increased exercise, lessened stiffness, improved joint pain and improved lower extremity strength and mobility.

Effective Examples

LIFE - Living (well through) Intergenerational Fitness and Exercise
Updated/reviewed November 2017
  • Need: Rural-residing older adults in Iowa have inadequate access to physical activity specialists and/or exercise facilities, which limits their ability to remain sufficiently active.
  • Intervention: Iowa State University implemented an intergenerational “exergaming” program to encourage fun and safe physical fitness among rural older adults.
  • Results: Pilot studies showed that older adults demonstrated increases in strength, flexibility, activity levels, and confidence in their ability to be physically active. Younger adults experienced reduced ageism and increased knowledge and expectations of aging.
funded by the Federal Office of Rural Health Policy Livingston County Help For Seniors
Updated/reviewed August 2016
  • Need: Meeting the health needs of geriatric patients in rural Livingston County, New York.
  • Intervention: The Help for Seniors program was developed and using its “vodcasts,’ local EMTs were trained in geriatric screening methods and health needs treatment.
  • Results: In addition to developing a successful model for educating EMS personnel, the program screened over 1200 individuals and identified various risks among the geriatric population.

Promising Examples

funded by the Federal Office of Rural Health Policy Community Health Coaches for Successful Care Transitions
Updated/reviewed September 2017
  • Need: To help older patients with chronic conditions learn to manage their illnesses and thereby reduce hospital readmissions in Oconee County, South Carolina.
  • Intervention: Community volunteers trained as health coaches mentor discharged patients with certain chronic conditions, to help them transition from home health care to self-care.
  • Results: Participants had improved health behaviors and reduced readmissions.
Northland PACE (Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly)
Updated/reviewed January 2017
  • Need: Older adults who are nursing home eligible need assistance in order to remain living safely and independently in their own homes.
  • Intervention: Northland PACE (Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly) offers, plans, and coordinates a wide range of healthcare, in-home, and day center services to promote independence at home.
  • Results: Older adults remain safely in their homes for a longer period of time with this support. The PACE program sites in North Dakota work to preserve, enhance, and, in many cases, restore the independence, health, and well-being of their participants.

Other Project Examples

SASH® (Support and Services at Home)
Updated/reviewed November 2017
  • Need: In Vermont, the growing population of older adults, coupled with a lack of a decentralized, home-based system of care management, posed significant challenges for those who wanted to remain living independently at home.
  • Intervention: SASH® (Support and Services at Home), based in affordable housing communities throughout the state, works with community partners to help older adults and people with disabilities receive the care they need so they can continue living safely at home.
  • Results: Compared to their non-SASH peers, SASH participants report better health outcomes like fewer falls, lower rates of hospitalizations, and completion of more advance directives – all of which has the potential of saving millions of dollars.
Rural Resources Diner’s Choice Program
Updated/reviewed October 2017
  • Need: Many older adults are lacking proper nutrition because of an inability to prepare food, lack of financial resources, depression due to social isolation, or general frailty associated with aging.
  • Intervention: The Diner's Choice meal program provides 12 coupons each month to older adults for local restaurants in two rural counties in Washington.
  • Results: Older adults in Pend Oreille and Stevens counties in Washington receive much-needed nutrition and social interaction, leading to healthier lives.
funded by the Federal Office of Rural Health Policy Worcester County Health Department Aging Initiative
Updated/reviewed August 2017
  • Need: Worcester County, Maryland's older residents were experiencing a lack of affordable and easily-accessible in-home care and behavioral health services.
  • Intervention: The Worcester County Health Department created the Aging Initiative project in order to increase access and utilization of home care and behavioral health services for older adults in the area.
  • Results: The Aging Initiative expanded access to home care services, financial assistance for medical equipment, and provided nearly 100 people with behavioral healthcare services.
SMiles Senior Transportation
Updated/reviewed July 2017
  • Need: Rural seniors who are no longer able to drive are often presented with the challenge of finding a means of transportation for medical visits, errands, and social gatherings.
  • Intervention: SMiles, a rural senior transportation program, was implemented in Blount County, Tennessee.
  • Results: Since 2013, SMiles has successfully provided over 18,000 rides to its rural seniors.
Care for Our Elders/Wakanki Ewastepikte
Updated/reviewed June 2017
  • Need: To provide Lakota elders with tools and opportunities for advance care planning.
  • Intervention: An outreach program in South Dakota helps Lakota elders with advance care planning and wills by providing bilingual brochures and advance directive coaches.
  • Results: Care for Our Elders saw an increase in the number of Lakota elders understanding the differences between a will and a living will and the need to have end-of-life discussions with family and healthcare providers.