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Rural Project Examples: Health occupations

Other Project Examples

Frontier Area Rural Mental Health Camp and Mentorship Program (FARM CAMP)
Updated/reviewed August 2019
  • Need: To reduce the shortage of behavioral health professionals in rural Nebraska.
  • Intervention: A week-long camp teaches high school students in rural and tribal communities about different career options in behavioral health and provides mentorship after the camp ends.
  • Results: In 2019, 13 high school students participated in the camp, with six alumni returning. Eight students attended the camps in 2018, with four alumni returning. Many camp participants talk about their positive experiences with younger students.
Opioid Overdose Prevention Outreach Program
Updated/reviewed August 2019
  • Need: To reduce opioid use disorder and overdose deaths in Maryland's Eastern Shore counties.
  • Intervention: An outreach program educates healthcare providers, EMS staff, and laypeople on the risks of opioids, prevention and treatment options, and Narcan training.
  • Results: Program coordinators have presented information to 988 people in Maryland's Eastern Shore counties and certified 609 people in Narcan training.
funded by the Federal Office of Rural Health Policy Ohio Northern University's HealthWise Mobile Outreach Program
Updated/reviewed July 2019
  • Need: Meeting both advanced practice pharmacy student education needs and patient healthcare needs in a nearby rural/underserved area.
  • Intervention: With support from multiple organizations, students in the Ohio Northern University's College of Pharmacy program use a motor coach to deliver a wide range of healthcare services during scheduled outreach visits.
  • Results: In the program's first two years, point-of-care screening, immunizations, and chronic disease prevention and management education have been provided to 800+ Hardin County, Ohio, residents.
Seneca Strong's Certified Recovery Peer Advocates
Added June 2019
  • Need: Like many Native American populations, the Seneca Nation of Indians has experienced disproportionate rates of opioid, alcohol, and substance misuse.
  • Intervention: The Seneca Nation Government and Executives founded Seneca Strong, a cultural recovery peer advocate program, to try to reduce substance misuse across the Nation.
  • Results: Since the start of the program, 300 people have received help from recovery peer advocates. Seneca Strong has since extended to meet the needs of Allegany and Cattaraugus territories.
Taos First Steps Program
Updated/reviewed May 2019
  • Need: Support for families that promotes early childhood development and the parent-child relationship.
  • Intervention: Home visits which provide information, support, and access to early childhood resources and tools for building relationships.
  • Results: Easily replicable program, even for rural areas, that result in growth in knowledge and self-sufficiency for families as they provide for and understand their child's earliest years.
funded by the Health Resources Services Administration Sexual Assault Nurse Exams through the National TeleNursing Center
Updated/reviewed April 2019
  • Need: Clinicians in rural areas are often unprepared to treat sexual assault victims after an assault.
  • Intervention: The National TeleNursing Center (NTC) in Massachusetts uses telemedicine to connect Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners to clinicians in remote areas, offering them guidance through examinations.
  • Results: Clinicians report that the help gives them confidence through the examination process and NTC has assisted in the care of over 300 patients.
Pathways to Healthcare Professions
Added December 2018
  • Need: Healthcare professionals and support staff are in high demand on tribal reservations in the Great Plains region.
  • Intervention: The Great Plains Tribal Chairmen's Health Board of South Dakota offer healthcare occupation courses for industry-recognized healthcare certifications and post-secondary degrees through the Health Profession Opportunity Grants program.
  • Results: Since the program's start, 241 participants have completed a healthcare training program, and 109 have found employment in healthcare occupations. Both participants and healthcare providers have expressed the value in local and cultural training for these healthcare professions.
Rugby Community Paramedic Program
Updated/reviewed December 2018
  • Need: Low patient volumes, a shortage of EMS volunteers, and an aging population in a 5-county North Dakota region required a change in the way the Rugby EMS team delivered care.
  • Intervention: Through the Rugby Community Paramedic Program, EMS staff brought medical care to patients transitioning back into their homes, including hospice patients and those with chronic conditions.
  • Results: The program's early intervention methods helped reduce the number of emergency room admissions and the escalation of medical conditions. Patient satisfaction improved, and the program gained the trust of patients and medical staff in Rugby and surrounding areas.
funded by the Health Resources Services Administration Targeted Rural Underserved Track (TRUST) Program
Updated/reviewed December 2018
  • Need: There is a shortage of rural physicians in the Northwestern United States.
  • Intervention: University of Washington medical students are receiving training through the TRUST program in rural, underserved communities across a five-state radius.
  • Results: Long-lasting connections have been formed among regional and underserved communities, medical students, and rural health professionals, producing more rural physicians as a result.
funded by the Federal Office of Rural Health Policy The Bridge Program
Updated/reviewed November 2018
  • Need: Access to primary medical, dental, and mental health services for rural Appalachia Kentuckians.
  • Intervention: Community Health Workers provide outreach, education, navigation, and care coordination services to 5 counties in the Western Appalachian area of Kentucky through The Bridge Program.
  • Results: Emergency room visits have decreased throughout the course of the program and referrals to healthcare services have increased. Increases in self-efficacy and decreases in A1C levels have reached statistical significance.