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Rural Project Examples: HIV and AIDS

Other Project Examples

Positively Living
Updated/reviewed October 2019
  • Need: To provide care and support to eastern Tennesseans living with HIV/AIDS, disabilities, mental illness, substance use disorder, and/or homelessness.
  • Intervention: Positively Living provides services like counseling, case management, an HIV/AIDS clinic, and supportive housing.
  • Results: The program currently has 75 PrEP clients and in 2016 opened a second clinic to serve 12 more counties.
Rapid HCV Testing as an HIV Testing Strategy in Rural Areas
Updated/reviewed October 2019
  • Need: To provide HIV testing in rural areas while navigating around HIV stigma.
  • Intervention: A pilot study to provide HCV (Hepatitis C Virus) rapid tests and then offer an HIV rapid test as well.
  • Results: An increase in the number of people tested for HCV and HIV.
Telehealth Collaborative Care
Updated/reviewed August 2019
  • Need: To increase access to specialty care for rural veterans living with HIV.
  • Intervention: The Telehealth Collaborative Care (TCC) study connects these patients with HIV specialists via clinical video telehealth or video on demand and works to create shared care relationships with primary care teams in rural areas.
  • Results: TCC provides HIV specialty care to 600 rural veterans in Georgia and Texas and has expanded to include Indiana, Ohio, Mississippi, and Florida.
Foundations Family Medicine's HIV, HCV, Opioid and Substance Use Disorder Services
Added November 2018
  • Need: Due to the opioid crisis, Austin, Indiana has seen the largest concentrated outbreak of HIV in rural America's recent history. Since 2015, over 200 residents have been diagnosed with the virus.
  • Intervention: Foundations Family Medicine began offering testing and treatment services for HIV, hepatitis C, and opioid/substance use disorder. Education, care coordination and behavioral health services were also offered as an integrated part of their primary care clinic.
  • Results: Although the virus continues to spread throughout Scott County, the rate has significantly decreased, outdoing national suppression rates by a large margin (76% compared to national average of 49%).