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Montana News

News stories from the past 60 days.

In a State Troubled by Suicide, Teens Learn Mental Health Skills
Jul 24, 2018 - Highlights high rates of teen suicide in Montana and the introduction of the Youth Aware of Mental Health (YAM) program in 14 public high schools, ranging from very small to very large, including three in the pilot group that were majority Native American. According to the 2017 Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 20.8% of Montana high school students had seriously considered suicide and 9.5% had attempted suicide in the 12 months prior to the survey. 18.3% of Native American students had attempted suicide in that time. Also touches on the high demand for mental healthcare professionals in the state and efforts to expand the program to the entire state.
Source: High Country News
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‘Recovery Is Possible — and We’re Examples of It’
Jul 10, 2018 - Discusses behavioral health peer support specialists in Montana, where the professional was formalized last year. Peer supporters are people who have dealt with addiction or mental illness in the past and who, with professional training, help others work through their present struggles with these issues. Touches on a project called Never Alone that was developed in a rural town in the state to provide a drop-in center with recovery groups in the evenings during the week and social activities on the weekends.
Source: High Country News
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Montana Is Losing Essential Mental Health Services
Jul 9, 2018 - Highlights the barriers to accessing mental and behavioral healthcare in Montana. Also touches on the history of mental healthcare in the state and on efforts to overcome those barriers. Montana spent $241 per capita on state mental health programs in 2015 and was ranked 29th in the nation. By contrast, neighboring North Dakota only spent $94 per capita and was ranked 15th.
Source: High Country News
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New UM Docs Ready to Cross Montana to Begin Rural Family Medicine
Jul 2, 2018 - Details the University of Montana's Family Medicine Residency, which focuses on training doctors to work in the state, especially in rural and underserved areas. When the program began in 2013, it had 10 students and four faculty members. Now it has 30 residents and 13 faculty. This rural-focused residency was established to address Montana's growing need for primary care providers that is only expected to get worse as older doctors retire.
Source: Missoula Current
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Last Updated: 7/26/2018