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Rural Project Examples: Networking and collaboration

Effective Examples

Pharmacists for Patient Safety Network
Updated/reviewed August 2019
  • Need: Pharmacists in rural Nebraska are often isolated and find it difficult to communicate with others about safety concerns.
  • Intervention: The Pharmacists for Patient Safety Network is a communication network in which pharmacists can identify safety concerns and share solutions.
  • Results: After one year of implementation, 30 of the 38 participating pharmacies reported that the network encouraged new safety practices and reinforced existing safety strategies.
Medical Legal Partnership of Southern Illinois
Updated/reviewed June 2019
  • Need: Legal barriers often prevent economically disadvantaged people in Southern Illinois from obtaining positive health outcomes despite receiving medical care.
  • Intervention: The Medical Legal Partnership of Southern Illinois (MLPSI) was formed to create a system where medical providers can refer patients in need of legal assistance to local attorneys.
  • Results: Over 4,300 patients have utilized MLPSI since its founding in 2002. The program has relieved over $8.1 million in medical debt for both hospitals and patients.

Promising Examples

Maryland Faith Health Network
Updated/reviewed May 2018
  • Need: To coordinate formal and informal community-based caregivers for optimal patient experience.
  • Intervention: The Maryland Faith Health Network unites places of worship and healthcare systems in Maryland. This program aims to decrease the amount of potentially avoidable hospitalizations, improve a patient's overall wellness, and cut down on the cost of medical services.
  • Results: This model is currently running in 3 hospitals that serve both rural and urban residents in central Maryland. So far, 1,300 congregants from 70 congregations representing Christian, Jewish, and Muslim faiths have enrolled in the Network.

Other Project Examples

Healthcare Georgia Foundation's CDFI Investments
Added December 2019
  • Need: In rural Georgia, poor health outcomes and high poverty rates require innovative approaches.
  • Intervention: As the only statewide private foundation in Georgia with the sole focus of improving health, Healthcare Georgia Foundation supports Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFIs) to do the same.
  • Results: With a program related investment from the Foundation, 2 statewide CDFIs and 1 national CDFI are providing low-interest loans and other support to rural healthcare efforts.
funded by the Federal Office of Rural Health Policy ASPIN's Certified Recovery Specialist Program
Updated/reviewed November 2019
  • Need: Improved approach in addressing the behavioral health and primary care disparities of Indiana's underserved rural counties.
  • Intervention: A network was established that trained community health workers (CHW) to be certified health insurance enrollment navigators and provide mental health services.
  • Results: This year, ASPIN trained 61 CHWs, cross-trained 37 behavioral health case managers as CHWs, and 26 individuals in the Indiana Navigator Pre-certification Education.
Heartland OK
Updated/reviewed November 2019
  • Need: To reduce rural Oklahoma patients' risks for heart disease and stroke.
  • Intervention: Heartland OK, which began in 5 rural counties, is a care coordination model.
  • Results: Using a team-based care model increases patients' ability to reduce their blood pressure or achieve blood pressure control.
Wisconsin Early Education Shared Service Network
Added November 2019
  • Need: Throughout the state of Wisconsin, childcare services are closing rapidly, with staffing and finance issues as the main causes.
  • Intervention: In Wisconsin's Monroe and Vernon Counties, a collaborative that focuses on addressing key childcare access issues has come up with a creative solution. The Wisconsin Early Education Shared Services Network allows childcare providers to pool staff, resources, and services while receiving support for business and educational operations.
  • Results: So far, 6 childcare programs in Monroe and Vernon Counties have joined the Shared Services Network and more are considering. Joining has allowed childcare providers to focus their time, finances, and energy on the children they serve.
funded by the Health Resources Services Administration Alaska Health Workforce Coalition
Updated/reviewed September 2019
  • Need: To ensure a well-qualified and sustainable Alaskan workforce to meet the current and future health care needs of its residents.
  • Intervention: Establishment of the Alaska Health Workforce Coalition (AHWC), a public-private partnership created to develop, facilitate, implement, and support a statewide health workforce system.
  • Results: Coalition efforts impacted multiple state policies and programs, including a loan repayment and incentives program, completion of a health vacancy study, and the development and expansion of health-related education programs.
Healthy Adams County
Updated/reviewed September 2019
  • Need: Health initiatives in rural Pennsylvania communities to address locally-identified health disparities.
  • Intervention: Healthy Adams County was created by its rural community members to promote community-wide health.
  • Results: Community task forces have been formed to address breast cancer prevention, food policies, behavioral health, health literacy, oral health, tobacco prevention, and other rural, community-identified needs.
Recovery-Oriented System of Care (ROSOC)
Updated/reviewed September 2019
  • Need: To serve adults in Mendocino County, California with chronic substance use disorders, mental health diagnoses, and/or complex medical conditions who frequently utilize emergency departments and jail services.
  • Intervention: A safety net organization was formed that works with medical providers and law enforcement to reduce the high cost of caring for frequent utilizers through intensive care coordination activities.
  • Results: Greater overall stability in the lives of clients, with less utilization of low-efficacy, crisis-oriented services, hospitalizations, and incarcerations.