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Rural Project Examples: Cancer

Evidence-Based Examples

Chronic Disease Self-Management Program
Updated/reviewed October 2017
  • Need: To help people with chronic conditions learn how to manage their health.
  • Intervention: A small-group 6-week workshop for individuals with chronic conditions to learn skills and strategies to manage their health.
  • Results: Participants have better health and quality of life, including reduction in pain, fatigue, and depression.
Sickness Prevention Achieved through Regional Collaboration (SPARC, Inc.®)
Updated/reviewed July 2017
  • Need: Population-based rates of adult vaccinations and cancer screenings are low, with fewer than 40% of older adults up to date with routinely recommended prevention services. Delivery rates are lower still in low-income and minority communities.
  • Intervention: SPARC was established to develop and test new community-wide strategies to increase the delivery of clinical preventive services.
  • Results: Across the United States in both rural and urban communities, SPARC programs, which broaden the delivery of potentially life-saving preventive services, have been successfully launched, improving residents' health.
Project ENABLE (Educate, Nurture, Advise Before Life Ends)
Added May 2017
  • Need: To enhance palliative care access to rural patients with advanced cancer and their family caregivers.
  • Intervention: Project ENABLE consists of: 1) an initial in-person palliative care consultation with a specialty-trained provider and 2) a semi-structured series of weekly, phone-delivered, nurse-led coaching sessions designed to help patients and their caregivers enhance their problem-solving, symptom management, and coping skills.
  • Results: Patients and caregivers report lower rates of depression and burden along with higher quality of life.

Effective Examples

Salud es Vida Cervical Cancer Education
Updated/reviewed January 2017
  • Need: Hispanic women have the highest incidence rates of cervical cancer among any ethnicity in the United States.
  • Intervention: The development of a lay health worker (promotora) curriculum that provides information on cervical cancer, HPV, and the HPV vaccine to Hispanic farmworker women living in rural southern Georgia.
  • Results: Significant increases in post-test scores relating to cervical cancer knowledge and increases in positive self-efficacy among promotoras.

Promising Examples

Texas C-STEP Project: Cancer Screening, Training, Education and Prevention Program
Added September 2017
  • Need: Improve screening rates for rural uninsured/underinsured patients in counties surrounding Bryan-College Station, Texas.
  • Intervention: An academic center's nursing and family medicine training programs partnered with its public health program to obtain state grant funds for execution of a coordinated cancer prevention and detection program.
  • Results: In 5 years of colorectal screening efforts, 18 cases of colorectal cancer were diagnosed in addition to detection of precancerous lesions in 25% of nearly 2000 screening colonoscopies. In 3 years of women’s health screening, 18 cases of breast cancer and 141 precancerous cervical lesions were also detected.
Proactive Palliative Care and Palliative Radiation Model: Making MyCourse Better
Updated/reviewed July 2017
  • Need: To provide palliative care to patients with stage 4 cancer.
  • Intervention: The Emily Couric Clinical Cancer Center in Charlottesville, Virginia, has implemented a three-part program to help these patients manage their symptoms.
  • Results: The Proactive Palliative Care and Palliative Radiation Model enrolled 646 patients during its three-year funding period of 2012-2015.
Patient Care Connect
Added September 2016
  • Need: Cancer patients living in the Deep South encounter multiple barriers in accessing regular cancer treatment.
  • Intervention: The University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center developed a program that uses patient navigators to support and direct patients to appropriate resources to overcome barriers to accessing care.
  • Results: The program has become a model for improving cancer care quality, decreasing unnecessary utilization (ER visits and hospitalizations), removing barriers to care, and enhancing patient satisfaction.

Other Project Examples

Mobile Women's Health Unit
Updated/reviewed July 2017
  • Need: Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths for the American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) female population, and those living in remote areas have difficulties getting screening mammograms.
  • Intervention: The Great Plains Area Indian Health Service Mobile Women's Health Unit provides mammograms to women on multiple reservations across four states.
  • Results: Approximately 1,000 women are screened annually for breast cancer in the mobile unit.
Women's Way
Updated/reviewed July 2017
  • Need: One in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in North Dakota. While breast and cervical cancer have high survival rates when detected early, many women are not able to access life-saving cancer screenings due to cost and lack of insurance.
  • Intervention: Women's Way of North Dakota was created to help women find a way to pay for breast and cervical cancer screenings.
  • Results: From the program’s beginnings in 1997 through May 2017, Women's Way has provided new first-time screening services for nearly 14,500 women and helped hundreds of women with positive results find treatment.
Putting Healthy Food on the Table
Updated/reviewed June 2017
  • Need: To reduce cancer rates in Appalachian Ohio by increasing fruit and vegetable intake.
  • Intervention: Ohio State University Extension-Vinton County established a community garden, container gardens, and classes to provide residents with fresh produce and healthy cooking/canning techniques.
  • Results: The number of gardeners has increased in Vinton County, providing residents with healthier food.

For examples from other sources, see: